Tag Archives: reading

December Reading Wrap-Up

December ended up being a busier and less reading-heavy month than I anticipated, but that’s okay, since I did finish the two books that my goal was to read and review. I celebrate Chrismakkuh, which means that there are generally a lot of holiday-related things going on throughout the month of December–even more so this year, as Hanukkah and Christmas were so far apart. But overall, it was a good reading end to 2018, especially as I managed to sneak in one last book from my top 10 TBR for the year as my last book for 2018.

Stats:

Total books finished: 5

#readmyowndamnbooks: 5

Audiobooks: 0

ebooks: 0

A Very Large Expanse of SeaThe Nine (Thieves of Fate, #1)AutonomousThe Similars by Rebecca HanoverThe Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O'Neill

Reviews:

The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill (4.25 stars) – The Lonely Hearts Hotel follows simultaneously lucky and unlucky orphans Rose and Pierrot, who are artistically gifted but coming of age in Montreal during the Great Depression. It follows them through their childhood at a harsh orphanage, their separation and descent into different aspects of Montreal’s underworld, and path toward their dreams of a show together. I had mixed feelings throughout a lot of this book, but I ended up really loving Rose’s character and her arc, particularly towards the end. I thought that the writing was fairytale-esque and often beautiful, but sometimes became almost too silly, so that took away from the rating a bit. But there’s a lot of really wonderful aspects to this book, and I’d recommend it overall. It’s definitely difficult to read at times, especially due to the instances of child abuse, but it exposes a lot of essential truths that are often difficult to articulate.

The Nine by Tracy Townsend (4.25 stars) – I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this unique fantasy novel, which features tons of action and plot twists along with unique and morally grey characters. I did a full review of The Nine here.

Autonomous by Annalee Newitz (3 stars) – Autonomous imagines a future where crime seems to revolve around pharmaceutical piracy, as prescription drug costs have skyrocketed and only the rich can afford to live long and healthy lives with the aid of medication. We follow Jack, a pirate whose distribution of a reverse-engineered drug reveals the fact that the original drug is deeply flawed and causes deadly addition to its consumers. As Jack flees the authorities tracking her down, she’s also trying to find a cure for the dangerous drug she unwittingly distributed. I thought that the premise of Autonomous was really interesting, and the scientific aspects were well-thought-out and detailed, but the actual plot left something to be desired for me as it was mainly an extended chase that focused alternately on Jack and her pursuers.

A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi (3 stars) – I’m a huge fan of Tahereh Mafi’s Shatter Me series so I was really interested to check out her contemporary YA debut. A Very Large Expanse of Sea follows Shirin, a Muslim teenager who has just moved to a new town and a new high school a few years after 9/11. While pursuing her passion of breakdancing, Shirin is forced to deal with rampant prejudice from the people around her. I absolutely loved Shirin as a main character. I loved that she was complex and passionate, with a bunch of diverse interests and hobbies (breakdancing, sewing her own clothes, art, journaling) yet she finds it really difficult to connect with other people due to the racism she experiences on a near-constant basis. I would have been happy reading a book entirely focused on Shirin, her family, her breakdancing crew, and her opening up enough to make friends, but unfortunately the book focused much more on her romantic connection with Ocean, the star of her school’s basketball team, who I found to be a much less interesting character.

The Similars by Rebecca Hanover (3 stars) – I received an ARC of The Similars at BookCon, and will be posting a full review within the next week. Essentially, I really liked the book’s main character, but I had a lot of issues with the plausibility of the plot.

 

How was your reading in December? Are you already looking ahead to your reading in 2019, like I am?

Another Most Anticipated 2019 Book Releases List

So…yeah. A few weeks ago I patted myself on the back for being all ready to post about my most anticipated 2019 book releases, and I really liked the way that the post turned out, because at the time it contained all of the books at the absolute top of my list for the first half of next year.

And then.

Then I started hearing about more and more fantastic-sounding book releases that I somehow missed hearing about before I posted that blog. I was debating whether I should go back and add to the original post, but organization-wise, I really hate that thought, so here we are.

It’s another list of highly anticipated 2019 book releases! Overall, I’d say I know less about the books on this list than on my previous one, because a lot of those were sequels and books from authors I already know I love, whereas these are mainly books I don’t know a ton about and most are from new-to-me authors. Because of that, I probably won’t have quite as much to say about them.

In order of release date, here we go!

The Water Cure

The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh (release date January 8th) – Ways to get me to put a book on my TBR include releasing a blurb like this one, from Goodreads: “The Handmaid’s Tale meets The Virgin Suicides in this dystopic feminist revenge fantasy about three sisters on an isolated island, raised to fear men.”

A Cathedral of Myth and Bone

A Cathedral of Myth and Bone by Kat Howard (release date January 8th) – I honestly don’t know how this one got left off of my original post, because it’s a) a short story collection and b) from an author I really like. I’ve read two previous books by Kat Howard (Roses and Rot and An Unkindness of Magicians) and loved her creative concepts and strong female characters in both. According to Goodreads, this collection focuses on stories about “the lives of women untold and unexplored.” OK, 2019, just take all of my money.

The Last Romantics

The Last Romantics by Tara Conklin (release date February 5th) – I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this book from the publisher, and it sounds really intriguing. From Goodreads, “A sweeping yet intimate epic about one American family, The Last Romantics is an unforgettable exploration of the ties that bind us together, the responsibilities we embrace and the duties we resent, and how we can lose—and sometimes rescue—the ones we love. A novel that pierces the heart and lingers in the mind, it is also a beautiful meditation on the power of stories—how they navigate us through difficult times, help us understand the past, and point the way toward our future.”

Black Leopard, Red Wolf (The Dark Star Trilogy #1)

Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James (release date February 5th) – I’ve already been hearing so much hype about this book, the first in a new fantasy series by Man Booker prize-winning author Marlon James, and since I’ve been looking for a unique new fantasy series to dive into, I’ve got my eye on this one.

The Test

The Test by Sylvain Neuvel (release date February 12th) – all I know about this one is that it’s a Tor.com novella about a citizenship test that turns out to have deadly consequences. That’s really all I need to know. I did read Neuvel’s previous book Sleeping Giants, which I enjoyed but wasn’t blown away by, and I’m not sure if I’m going to continue with that trilogy, but I’m on board for this novella.

Gingerbread

Gingerbread by Helen Oyeyemi (release date March 5th) – Oyeyemi’s White is for Witching ended up being one of my favorite books of 2018, so I’m definitely looking to pick up more from her next year. From Goodreads, “Influenced by the mysterious place gingerbread holds in classic children’s stories–equal parts wholesome and uncanny, from the tantalizing witch’s house in “Hansel and Gretel” to the man-shaped confection who one day decides to run as fast as he can–beloved novelist Helen Oyeyemi invites readers into a delightful tale of a surprising family legacy, in which the inheritance is a recipe.

If, Then

If, Then by Kate Hope Day (release date March 12th) – From Goodreads, “The residents of a sleepy mountain town are rocked by troubling visions of an alternate reality in this dazzling debut that combines the family-driven suspense of Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere with the inventive storytelling of The Immortalists.” Alternate reality visions? Yes.

Never-Contented Things

Never-Contented Things by Sarah Porter (release date March 19th) – Great cover. Great title. Dark, fae-related YA fantasy. I’m into it.

Wicked Saints (Something Dark and Holy #1)

Wicked Saints by Emily Duncan (release date April 2nd) – I’m always here for a dark YA fantasy. I honestly don’t even need to know much about this one; it’s happening.

The Right Swipe (Modern Love, #1)

The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai (release date July 2nd) – Technically I’m breaking my rule about only posting about books being published in the first half of 2019 with this one, but it’s close, so I’ll let it slide. 2018 was the year I discovered the fantastic Alisha Rai after seeing her speak so eloquently on a panel at BookCon about the problem of toxic men in romance novels, and I’m really looking forward to whatever she writes next. From Goodreads: “Alisha Rai returns with the first book in her sizzling new Modern Love series, in which two rival dating app creators find themselves at odds in the boardroom but in sync in the bedroom.” Of course they are!

 

Seriously, guys. SO MANY good books are coming out in 2019, I have no idea how I’m going to read them all, let alone my current TBR backlist. But hey, I’m going to have a great time trying 🙂

Did any of these make your most anticipated list for 2019? What books have I still forgotten? Let me know in the comments!

Most Anticipated 2019 Book Releases

Here’s the thing about one year ending and the new year beginning: I tend to get caught up in all of the year-end bookishness (lists of favorites, yearly wrap-ups, etc) that sometimes the next year’s releases fall by the wayside and I miss hearing about some of the wonderful new books that will be coming out. But not this year! I’m trying to stay more on top of new releases so that I can focus on picking up books I’m really excited about in 2019 (while still prioritizing reading my physical TBR and backlist a good percentage of the time). Also, the fact is that 2019 is shaping up to be an AWESOME year in terms of books, and I am very, very excited. So many of my favorite authors are coming out with new books this year, and I’m sure I’ll soon be overwhelmed with all of the amazing new-to-me authors coming out with books as well.

I will say that this list probably has a lot of limitations: obviously it’s skewed towards my personal reading tastes, and a lot of the books on here are sequels, because those are the releases I tend to hear about first. It also out of necessity focuses on new releases for the first half of 2019; I think I might post a follow-up preview for the second half of the year (maybe after BookCon! I just bought my ticket). But I hope that you can all find some intriguing books on here as well, or maybe check out some of these authors’ backlists too.

So here, with no further ado, are my most anticipated book releases for the first half of 2019! They’re listed in order of release date.

 

In an Absent Dream (Wayward Children, #4)

In An Absent Dream by Seanan McGuire (Wayward Children #4) (Release date 1/8/19) – I’ve been loving this YA novella series about children who enter fairytale worlds and then find themselves back in reality since the first book was released, and it’s really not a series that can get old, considering the number of different worlds that McGuire has already laid down the foundations for. Apparently, this one is set in a goblin market. I pre-ordered this one, so it’s probably going to be one of the first books I pick up in 2019.

The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air, #2)

The Wicked King by Holly Black (The Folk of the Air #2) (Release date 1/8/19) – I enjoyed The Cruel Prince much more than I thought I would (I gave it 3.5 stars), and I’m definitely interested to see how things play out in the fairy world in the sequel. I haven’t pre-orderd this one, though, and I may wait awhile before picking it up, since it’s not necessarily one of the new releases on this list that I feel like I have to get to RIGHT AWAY.

Mouthful of Birds: Stories

Mouthful of Birds: Stories by Samanta Schweblin (Release date 1/8/19) – I’m a huge fan of weird short story collections, and I absolutely loved Schweblin’s Fever Dream, which was a short, intensely strange novel that was one of my favorite reads in 2017. Also, the cover of this book is ridiculously gorgeous and colorful.

99 Percent Mine

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne (Release date 1/19/19) – 2018 ended up being the year I discovered contemporary romance, and one of my favorites that was responsible for this reading trend was Thorne’s The Hating Game. Because of that, I’m super excited to read more from her, and I’ve already pre-ordered this one. I believe it’s about a woman who’s in love with her twin brother’s off-limits best friend, who she has to flip a house with. Sounds fun! The book, not the house-flipping.

The Dreamers

The Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker (Release date 1/15/19) – I’m going to go with the Goodreads blurb for this one, by the author of The Age of Miracles, which was a sort of beautiful and slow-moving pre-apocalypse type of novel I read last year: The Dreamers is “a mesmerizing novel about a college town transformed by a strange illness that locks victims in a perpetual sleep and triggers life-altering dreams…for fans of Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go.” Since the two books it’s compared to are two of my favorites and I found The Age of Miracles very promising if not awesome, I’m pretty interested in this one.

The City in the Middle of the Night

The City in the Middle of the Night by Charlie Jane Anders (Release date 2/12/19) – I first heard of Charlie Jane Anders when she was the editor of io9, which used to be one of my favorite sources of SFF news and book recommendations; I’ve seen her speak on panels at BookCon, where she wowed me with her brilliance, and I now religiously listen to her podcast with Annalee Newitz, which is called Our Opinions Are Correct. I liked but didn’t love her first novel, All the Birds in the Sky, and I really like the sound of this new one. Again, we’re going to turn to Goodreads for some help on this one since I don’t know too much about it:

Set on a planet that has fully definitive, never-changing zones of day and night, with ensuing extreme climates of endless, frigid darkness and blinding, relentless light, humankind has somehow continued apace — though the perils outside the built cities are rife with danger as much as the streets below. But in a world where time means only what the ruling government proclaims, and the levels of light available are artificially imposed to great consequence, lost souls and disappeared bodies are shadow-bound and savage, and as common as grains of sand. And one such pariah, sacrificed to the night, but borne up by time and a mysterious bond with an enigmatic beast, will rise to take on the entire planet–before it can crumble beneath the weight of human existence.”

Storm of Locusts (The Sixth World, #2)

Storm of Locusts by Rebecca Roanhorse (The Sixth World #2) (Release date 4/23/19) – I was lucky enough to get a free copy of Roanhorse’s debut, Trail of Lightning, at BookCon, and fell in love with her post-apocalyptic world and strong female protagonist. I can’t wait to hear more about where things are going in this unique, creative series set after climate change has decimated what was once the United States and strange powers and monsters out of Navajo mythology have awakened..

The Bride Test (The Kiss Quotient, #2)

The Bride Test by Helen Hoang (The Kiss Quotient #2) (Release date 5/7/19) – Hoang’s The Kiss Quotient was probably my favorite contemporary romance of 2018 due to its sweet, sexy romance and smart writing. I’m really looking forward to picking up more from Helen Hoang; The Bride Test follows Khai, a character we met in The Kiss Quotient who is autistic, and the potential bride his mother brings back for him from Vietnam who falls for him.

Middlegame

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire (Release date 5/7/19) – I’ve loved Seanan McGuire for a long time; I’ve enjoyed her October Daye, Indexing, and Wayward Children series, and am intrigued by this new, stellar-sounding standalone about twins with strange powers aspiring to become new gods. From Goodreads:

Meet Roger. Skilled with words, languages come easily to him. He instinctively understands how the world works through the power of story. Meet Dodger, his twin. Numbers are her world, her obsession, her everything. All she understands, she does so through the power of math. Roger and Dodger aren’t exactly human, though they don’t realise it. They aren’t exactly gods, either. Not entirely. Not yet. Meet Reed, skilled in the alchemical arts like his progenitor before him. Reed created Dodger and her brother. He’s not their father. Not quite. But he has a plan: to raise the twins to the highest power, to ascend with them and claim their authority as his own. Godhood is attainable. Pray it isn’t attained.”

 

Kingsbane (Empirium, #2)

Kingsbane by Claire Legrand (Empirium #2) (Release date 5/21/19) – I was surprised by how much I enjoyed Legrand’s Furyborn, which ended up being one of my favorite YA reads of the year, and am very excited to see where she takes the series. The Empirium series follows two young women, the Sun Queen and the Blood Queen, living a thousand years apart in a land torn apart by magic and angels, and Kingsbane is hopefully going to give us some intriguing answers into how the world came to be this way.

Rage (Stormheart, #2)

Rage by Cora Carmack (Stormheart #2) (Release date 6/11/19) – I picked up Roar, Carmack’s first book in the stormheart trilogy, my first time at BookCon, because I love when books involve weather magic. I ended up really enjoying the YA fantasy world that Carmack created, and I’m looking forward to seeing Roar, a princess on the run, hopefully come into her own in the second book.

 

Other 2019 books that I’m excited about but that don’t have firm release dates yet, and/or covers, and/or are happening too far in the future to go into detail yet: Sweep of the Blade by Ilona Andrews (Book 3.5 in her science fiction Innkeeper Chronicles series, focused on the main character’s formerly missing sister and a space vampire, unknown release date); Sapphire Flames by Ilona Andrews (book 1 in a new trilogy following Catalina, the younger sister of Nevada from the Hidden Legacy series, release date 8/27/19); Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo (book 1 in a new series focused on Yale secret societies, release date 10/1/19); the second book in Ilona Andrews’s Iron Covenant trilogy (no release date yet); Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell (Simon Snow #2, no release date yet). Again, I’ll go into these more in probably May/June with another Most Anticipated Reads List for the second half of 2019.

 

Are any of these books on your most anticipated lists as well? What books are you excited for that I missed? Let me know in the comments!

November Reading & NaNoWriMo Wrap-Up

November was a rough month on the reading front, as I was devoting a lot of my time to NaNoWriMo. If you’re not familiar, that stands for National Novel Writing Month, which is an event that encourages you to writing a 50,000-word short novel in the month of November. There’s online interaction and in-person write-ins that give you encouragement, in addition to famous writers posting inspirational essays throughout the month. This was my second time participating, and I was able to write about 30,000 words (which definitely isn’t 50k, but is still a ton for me!).

I was working on the first draft of the fantasy novel that I started writing last year, and I’m finally, finally nearing the end! In addition to getting done a bunch in terms of actual word counts, I was able to really map out the plot for the remainder of the book. I’m really hoping to finish the draft by the end of the year so that I can start editing in 2019, but I’m anticipating December being a super busy month, so I’m not sure if that’s realistic. We’ll see!

In terms of reading, I was only able to finish 4 books this month, which is the lowest so far this year. But! I definitely wasn’t anticipating a big reading month due to NaNoWriMo, so my expectations were low, and I ended up loving 3 out of the 4 books that I did get to read this month. And I’m not mad about a low book count if I’m getting quality over quantity. So here’s how my reading went:

Stats:

Total books read: 4

#readmyowndamnbooks: 3

Audiobooks: 0

ebooks: 1

Get in Trouble: StoriesDiamond Fire (Hidden Legacy, #3.5)Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, #1)Space Opera

Get in Trouble by Kelly Link (5 stars) – Get in Trouble by Kelly Link is an amazingly creative short story collection that blends genres and concepts into unsettling, profound, thought-provoking tales. In the hands of another writer, one aspect of one of Link’s stories could fill an entire novel, but in Link’s hands disparate ideas and worlds are explored in 40 pages to a perfect level of depth while still leaving the reader room for interpretation.

A few of my favorites were:
– “The Summer People,” which at first seems like it’s about a sick girl abandoned by her alcoholic father, except then you learn about the neighboring house where the fairies live
– “Two Houses,” about a group of astronauts telling each other ghost stories while in the backs of their minds they can’t forget their own ship’s twin, which mysteriously disappeared decades ago
– “Secret Identity,” about a girl lying about her identity to a man online in a world where superheroes and supervilains are a common sight

No two stories are anything alike, and I was perpetually stunned by Link’s bottomless reserves of unique ideas. If you like weird, genre-blending fiction, I highly, highly recommend picking this one up.

Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente (4.5 stars) – I really wasn’t expecting this book to be as wonderful and impactful for me as it was. It’s about an intergalactic singing competition designed as a way for newly discovered species to prove their sentience, and Earth is up next. It’s quirky and hilarious, with every sentence packed full of metaphor after metaphor, and although humor in books is tricky because not everything works for everyone, this style was perfect for me. The book goes from hilarity to a profound degree of emotional depth near the end, and I was crying as I finished the book. I think it’s great for fans of Becky Chambers’s Wayfarers series, because both are more positive science fiction works that deal a lot with interpersonal relationships, and also for fans of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, which I actually didn’t like very much but I can see how you could easily jump from that book to this one. This is the third book I’ve picked up from Valente and I want to read her entire catalog of work.

Diamond Fire by Ilona Andrews (4 stars) – Ilona Andrews is one of my favorite authors in general, and my favorite UF/PNR author in particular, so every time she starts a new series I am very excited. This was a novella bridging the gap between the Hidden Legacy trilogy, narrated by private investigator Nevada Baylor, and a new trilogy narrated by her younger sister Catalina, who has also grown up working in the family’s P.I. firm and has a very unique kind of magic. It was a lot of fun and really got me on board with Catalina as a main character; I’m really looking forward to the first full book in her trilogy, Sapphire Flames, which comes out in 2019.

Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri (3 stars) – I received an ARC of Emprie of Sand from the publisher at BookCon. While a great premise, this book ended up being a bit of a disappointment for me. You can check out my full review here.

 

How did your reading/writing go in November? Let me know in the comments!

October Reading Wrap-Up

It’s the end of October, which means the end of my month of spooky/thriller-y/creepy/fall-ish reads. I definitely had some fun with my reading this month, although my ratings were all over the place, and I think I got my fix of October-type books for the year. I had a great time participating in Dewey’s 24-hour Readathon this month, and today I dressed up as Hermione Granger for Halloween, which was super fun. Now we’re on to November and NaNoWriMo next, so my wrap-up for next month likely won’t be nearly as impressive as this one is.

Total books read: 10

#readmyowndamnbooks: 7

Audiobooks: 2

Ebooks: 1

The Bone Witch (The Bone Witch, #1)Till DeathThe Haunting of Hill HouseWhite Is for Witching by Helen OyeyemiSadie by Courtney SummersNeverworld WakeA Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain by Adrianne HarunMy Lady's Choosing by Kitty CurranZoo City by Lauren BeukesA Duke by Default (Reluctant Royals, #2)

White is for Witching by Helen Oyeyemi (5 stars) – White is for Witching was one of those 5 star reads that sneaks up on you; I wasn’t expecting it to be as impactful as it was. It’s a dark, creepy, unsettling, and strange book that’s fascinatingly and intricately composed. Oyeyemi’s writing is beautifully strange and meandering, following the living as well as ghosts, making you question what’s real and what’s not. She also tackles themes of racism and xenophobia in unexpected ways. White is for Witching follows Miranda, a girl who suffers from pica, a compulsion to eat what’s not food. As she devours chalk and plastic, she grieves for her mother and is haunted by a house with a past—a past that seeks to encompass her too. I don’t want to reveal too much about the story, because learning its aspects is part of the experience of this book, but I highly recommend this to readers of magical realism or literary fiction who are looking for something to put them in the October mood.

My Lady’s Choosing by Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris (4 stars) – This book is SO MUCH FUN! If you enjoy Jane Austen and/or the Brontes and/or historical romance or romance in general, I highly recommend giving this book a shot. I wasn’t sure when I bought it whether it was my kind of thing, since I’ve never really read historical romance, but I found that having read a bunch of Jane Austen (as well as Jane Eyre) was a solid enough background to catch a lot of the references in this book. Basically, it’s a choose-your-own-adventure historical romance, where you are the heroine and must make decisions every few pages. There are 4 main storylines that you can follow, but each has a bunch of twists and turns and involve a mystery in addition to the romance storyline. In general, the four storylines revolve around either a Mr. Darcy-esque figure; a female adventurer; a Mr. Rochester-esque figure; and a Scottish guy, but there are other endings and romantic options in each of these stories beyond the main character. The book doesn’t take itself too seriously, and there’s a lot of humor and parodying of historical romance tropes; I laughed out loud so many times while reading this that I couldn’t read it in public. If you’re looking for a fun, lighthearted read (or a good book for a readathon!) I highly recommend picking this one up.

Neverworld Wake by Marisha Pessl (4 stars) – This book is strange, immersive, and claustrophobic at times, which makes it perfect to read in one sitting. Five teenagers, best friends, are in a car accident and find themselves hovering in what’s called a Neverworld Wake, a sort of in-between time loop between life and death. They’re trapped there, reliving the day of their accident, until they can bring themselves to vote unanimously for the only one of their group who will survive the accident. No one can agree on who deserves to survive, so they end up reliving their day in all sorts of crazy ways until they agree that they need to focus their time instead on the unsolved murder of the other member of their friend group, which took place a year earlier. I thought the writing was great, and I enjoyed the strangeness and creativity that went into the book’s concept. I wouldn’t say that I loved the ending, but I’d definitely recommend the book overall.

Till Death by Jennifer L. Armentrout (3.5 stars) – I’ve read a few Jennifer L. Armentrout books before (White Hot Kiss, the first two books of A Wicked Trilogy) and when I was at BookCon, I saw that she was going to be doing a signing and giveaway of this book, and luckily I was able to get in line while that was happening. Till Death is my favorite of hers so far; it’s a tightly written romantic thriller with a main character you’ll love and want to root for. It follows Sasha, who was abducted by a serial killer at nineteen and was the only one of his victims to escape, after which he killed himself. Ten years later, Sasha is finally mentally and emotionally ready to return to her hometown to help her mother run a bed and breakfast, but then creepy things start happening to make her wonder if the past is really over. Luckily, she also runs into her ex, who’s now a very attractive FBI agent. I don’t read a ton of thrillers, but this one was perfect for binge-reading and had a good mixture of thriller and romance elements.

Sadie by Courtney Summers (3.5 stars) – This is a book that’s definitely best listened to as an audiobook. It alternates between the perspective of Sadie, a girl whose younger sister was murdered and who is now on the hunt for her killer, and a true-crime podcast tracking Sadie and her sister’s story. Because of that, I found this really easy to listen to, since podcasts are normally easier for me to pay attention to than audiobooks. I didn’t think it was a perfect book; I wished it was more complex, and the ending was a bit anticlimactic, but overall it was definitely a good listen and a creative storytelling method.

A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain (3.5 stars) – This atmospheric book is hard to categorize in terms of genre. It follows a group of friends in a Northwestern town besieged by poverty and bad people–and that’s before the devil shows up. It deals a lot with violence against women and discrimination against indigenous communities, and according to the author’s acknowledgements “was sparked by outrage over the ongoing murders and disappearances of aboriginal women along Highway 16, the so-called Highway of Tears, in northern British Columbia.” The supernatural element was creepy and well-done, but I felt like the book could have been longer and developed its themes more fully.

A Duke by Default by Alyssa Cole (3 stars) – This was a fun contemporary romance about a woman who takes an internship at an armory in Scotland and ends up falling for her gruff instructor. I liked the heroine, Portia, quite a bit–she’s interesting, flawed, and easy to root for–but I wasn’t quite as much of a fan of her love interest, who for me was sort of a standard grumpy romance novel dude. I do think I’ll check out the other two books in this series, because overall I enjoyed Cole’s writing and I liked the snippets we got of Portia’s friends, who are the main characters of books 1 and 3.

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson (2.75 stars) – I…wasn’t impressed with this one. I keep wanting to like Shirley Jackson, but somehow her books/stories just don’t seem to quite click with me. This is probably going to be the last one I try; sometimes an author just doesn’t work for you, and that’s OK. The premise of this book is that a professor studying the arcane convinces three other people to accompany him to stay at Hill House, a notoriously malevolently haunted house, where the four of them will proceed to observe and study what happens. We primarily follow Eleanor, a sheltered 32-year-old who has spent most of her life caring for her sick mother, who has recently passed away, and are also introduced to Theodora, a free spirit, and Luke, the sketchy heir to Hill House. The biggest issue I had (probably?) was that I found all of the main characters very unlikable, but not in interesting or compelling ways. The four of them proceed to encounter various supernatural phenomena and learn about the story of Hill House, but this doesn’t happen very interestingly either, in my opinion. There were some well-written passages, and a few attempts at humor did really work for me; I was more interested in the book as a whole at the beginning, when I thought that the more interesting parts were yet to come. Unfortunately, in my opinion, the buildup just didn’t really go anywhere that interesting until the very end, which I sort of liked some aspects of.

Zoo City by Lauren Beukes (2.5 stars) – I really liked the original premise of this South Africa-set urban fantasy: when a person commits a serious crime, they magically obtain an Animal, which is sort of a companion and living representation of their guilt. There are a lot of theories about why this is happening and when it first started, but when the book is set, those with Animals are being driven into slums and have difficulty finding good jobs and homes (and in some countries are killed or imprisoned). The Animal is also sort of a guardian against a mysterious and deadly force called the Undertow, which takes a person if their Animal is killed. It’s a very unique premise, and I liked learning about all of the aspects of this concept, but unfortunately I didn’t like the story itself nearly as much. I found all of the characters to be very unlikable, but not necessarily in interesting ways (I don’t mind unlikable main characters as long as they’re done well) and the story meandered quite a bit before (in my opinion) a really unpleasant and unsatisfying ending. I wouldn’t really recommend this one, and I don’t think I’ll be picking up more from this author in the future. I like urban fantasy and am always looking for UF with a unique premise, but this was a disappointment for me.

The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco (1.5 stars) – Honestly, this book was a disappointment. YA fantasy can be very hit or miss for me, and this one just didn’t work. The premise of the book and its direction were very promising, but I just didn’t feel that it was executed well. There was a lot of infodumping, and the majority of the conversations between characters were also just infodumps in disguise; very little plot or character development happened over 400+ pages. I almost DNF’d it a few times, but kept hoping that things would pick up. Unfortunately, it’s not one I’d really recommend.

 

How did your October reading go?

Dewey’s Readathon Updates & Mid-Event Survey

We’re more than halfway through the readathon already! Here are my hour 12 updates:

1. What are you reading right now?

I’m reading A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain by Adrianne Harun and listening to Sawkill Girls by Claire Legrand.

2. How many books have you read so far?

So far I’ve finished one book, Neverworld Wake by Marisha Pessl, which I really enjoyed and gave 4 stars. I’ve also listened to about an hour of the audiobook of Sawkill Girls and am almost halfway done with Mountain.

3. What book are you most looking forward to for the second half of the Read-a-thon?

I think that after I finish A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain, I’m going to lighten the mood by reading some choose-your-own-adventure stories in My Lady’s Choosing: An Interactive Romance Novel.

4. Have you had many interruptions? How did you deal with those?

I took an unintentional nap a few hours ago; I’m feeling super tired today as it was an intense week at work. I then drank a bunch of coffee to wake myself back up and rally for the second half of the readathon. I also took a break to go to the gym, since it was rainy all day and I didn’t end up taking an audiobook walk .

5. What surprises you most about the Read-a-thon, so far?

It’s going by so fast! It’s already 8pm my time as I’m writing this update. I never make it the full 24 hours, and I’m trying to figure out how late I can stay up without throwing off my sleep schedule too much.

 

Hope everyone participating is enjoying their readathon as well!

Dewey’s Readathon TBR

It’s that time of year again! October means colder, rainier, more reading-friendly weather, candles, my famous pumpkin chili, spookiness and all things Halloween, and another round of Dewey’s 24-hour readathon.

If you’re a fellow bookish person and you’ve never heard of Dewey’s, check out the site here. It’s a twice-yearly readathon where the purported goal is to read for a full 24 hours–but don’t worry, most of us don’t make it to nearly that much. Essentially, it’s a day of reading as much as you can while connecting with fellow book lovers. You can post as much as you want on social media, enter a bunch of challenges, or just be a hermit all day and devote  yourself to books. Either way, it’s super fun and a great way to treat yourself on a Saturday. Dewey’s takes place this Saturday, October 20th, and it starts at a different time depending on what time zone you’re in; on the East Coast of the U.S., where I am, the readathon starts at 8 a.m. (although I almost never actually start reading that early).

One of my favorite parts of Dewey’s is, oddly, the planning. I like to think about what books to read in advance, because if you’re going to spend a day binge-reading, you’ll burn out fast if you try to read books that are too slow or complex (or at least I do!). I find that what works best for me are books with alternative formats (books that have text interspersed with images, interviews, documents, etc; think Illuminae or Night Film), short books (I like Tor.com novellas in particular), YA (you’re looking for a book that’s absorbing without being too strenuous to read, especially later in the day when you’re getting tired), and thrillers (because they’re gripping and fast-paced; I recommend Kanae Minato‘s books for the readathon). Keeping those things in mind, here’s my readathon TBR!

Neverworld WakeThe Rules and Regulations for Mediating Myths & MagicSawkill Girls

For YA books this time, I’ve come up with two: Neverworld Wake by Marisha Pessl and The Rules and Regulations for Mediating Myths and Magic by F.T. Lukens. Neverworld Wake is one that’s been highly recommended but I don’t know too much about–and I’d kind of like to keep it that way, since it’s a strange concept that I think involves time travel and purgatory and a murder investigation. Rules and Regulations is one that I picked up at BookCon; I think it’s a contemporary fantasy. And then I have the audiobook of Sawkill Girls by Clarie Legrand, because it’s good to have an audiobook option to give your eyes a break.

The Strange Bird: A Borne StoryThe End We Start FromA Portable ShelterA Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain

In terms of shorter books, I think I’ve found a few that will work for the readathon. I love Jeff Vandermeer, and I’m hoping to pick up his novella The Strange Bird, which is a companion to his novel Borne (which is fantastic, btw) when I’m in the mood for a shorter read during the readathon. Vandermeer writes weird fiction, and I’m interested to see an alternate perspective on Borne’s story, since the world he created in that book is so rich with detail and opportunity for further exploration. I also have on deck Megan Hunter’s The End We Start From, which is a short, sparsely written apocalyptic novel set while its main characters are fleeing a flooded London; A Portable Shelter by Kirsty Logan, which I believe also has short stories, and A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain by Adrianne Harun, which is sort of a creepy fantastical mystery.

My Lady's Choosing: An Interactive Romance NovelEmpire of Sand (The Books of Ambha)

To mix things up, I also have a choose-your-own-adventure style book, My Lady’s Choosing by Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris, that I think might be fun to pick up when I’m feeling sleepy or distracted; it’s not a book that you read straight through, but you can play around with different storylines. It’s sort of an interactive romance novel that also parodies historical romances. And then to round out my stack, I have an ARC of Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri that I got at BookCon, because it’s a book that I need to read before its release date in November.

Are any of you participating in Dewey’s? If so, I hope you enjoy the readathon!